Water saving ways to garden

At Ligaya Garden, we’ve tried almost every water saving technique that we’ve been able to find out about. The following are our favourites from that time. We found a few things unsuitable for our space, as you will with yours but they all work well in the right situation.

Mulch is a shield, a bandaid and a food source…

Your watering techniques may have to change in the not too distant future. Overhead watering and sprinklers may actually be banned in some areas and seasons. Flood irrigation (that’s what I call it when I forget to turn the hose off) could be another taboo.

Some every day watering tips

  • Don’t water in the full Sun, or if the temp is above 32 °C. A lot of your water will just evaporate.
  • Don’t water when it’s windy. You’ll lose a lot of your precious water to evaporation.
  • Water in the morning before 10 am. Too much water in the evenings can lead to mold on some plants.
  • If you must water in the daytime, don’t overhead water your plants. The water can focus the sunlight and make little magnifying glasses to burn your leaves.
  • Deeply water perennials two or three times a week.
  • Pot plants will need daily watering.
  • Put a saucer under pots and mulch on top.
  • Black pots can really cook and dry out the potting mix in them. Paint them white or have some kind of barrier between the pot and the Sun.
  • Check the temp of water coming out of your hose. It can get really hot in Summer.
  • Water with the rain. It can help water get to the root zone.
  • Water around the drip-line of the plant, This is where the roots are most active.
  • Give your plants a little overhead spray from time to time (out of direct Sun, of course). This helps keep humidity up and deters Spider Mites who thrive in dry conditions.

I like to water an area lightly once, then go back over it. That gives water time to soak in and helps subsequent passes with the hose soak in better…



These all tie in nicely to our other page on gardening through the heat – Gardening in the Heat which is full of tips and information to help you get your garden through Summer.

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